21 years later, King Paparazzi emerges from his silence about the death of Diana

Darren Lions, known as the "King of Paparazzi" or celebrity stalkers, doubted the official account of the 1997 death of British Princess Diana.
Lions said in an interview with the British newspaper Telegraph that 21 years after the Princess's death, the official version of the event was "not necessarily the truth."
Lions said he had many questions that needed to be answered about what happened on the tragic night of August 1997. "There were strange things," he said.
"I do not think we will get to the real story," said the former director of Big Picture.

A year-long investigation in Britain found that the Princess and her Egyptian boyfriend Dodi Fayed and the driver, Henry Paul, were killed as a result of a traffic accident due to the driver's negligence. The paparazzi were also blamed.
The "King of Paparazzi" was summoned to testify in the British official investigation, which continued until 2008.
While Darren admits that "he has no evidence of the death of the Princess of Wales," he said, "I'm lucky because I was not killed at the time."
Following the incident in the Paris road tunnel, the police detained a number of photographers, and the offices of a number of them were broken into and documents confiscated.

He said his office was raided after he was accused of selling pictures of the princess after she died directly in the incident, asserting that a photographer in Paris had taken pictures of the princess after her death but never sold. "I will never do that," he said.
Darren claims his staff were ill-treated on the street and received death threats, without giving further details.

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