The departure of the girl who opened eyes of the world to the tragedy of Yemen

With her shaky body and horrifying looks, the Yemeni girl, Amal Hussein, attracted the world's attention to her, summarizing the tragic circumstances of children in her war-torn homeland.
"My heart is broken, Amal was always smiling, and now I am worried about my other children," the 7-year-old's mother said in a telephone interview with the paper.The Amal family told the New York Times on Thursday that they had died in a refugee camp four miles from the hospital, leaving their hearts and hearts in their hearts.
Amal was lying in a health center in Aslam, 90 miles northwest of the capital, Sanaa. She was lying on a bed with her mother. While the nurses feed her every two hours with milk, but she vomits regularly and suffers from diarrhea.
The newspaper published a picture of hope, last week, to highlight the humanitarian crisis in Yemen, prompting the response of readers who expressed their grief and grief, and gave money to her family.
Dr. Makiya Mehdi, the doctor in charge of the girl, sat on her bed and passed her hands over her hair. She grabbed the soft skin that covered her arm and said sadly, "Look, there's no flesh anymore, just bones."
Amal's mother was also sick, lying next to her and receiving treatment for a "dengue fever" attack caused by mosquitoes, which multiply in stagnant water in their camp.
Amal was taken out of hospital last week while still sick, and was taken to the house made of straw and plastic panels.
Her mother said her condition had deteriorated with frequent episodes of vomiting and diarrhea. On 26 October she died.
There has been international pressure recently on Saudi Arabia, which leads the Arab alliance in Yemen, to resolve the Yemeni crisis peacefully, as the United States and Britain called for a cease-fire.
US Defense Secretary James Matisse called on the parties to the Yemeni conflict to cease fire within 30 days and engage in serious negotiations to end the war in the country.
"The terms of the peace talks must include stopping the fighting, removing arms from the border and putting the missiles under international supervision," Matisse said at a seminar organized by the US Institute of Peace in Washington on Tuesday.
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